Shagbark Hickory

In the late fall, it can be hard to find a lot of color in the landscape. Many of our flowers are starting to fade for the winter and the days are getting shorter and colder. One of my favorite things about fall is all the wonderful leaf colors through the landscape. One of my... Continue Reading →

Much Ado About Mulch

Every gardener knows that mulch is beneficial for their trees, shrubs and ornamental plantings, right? So how accurate is your mulch knowledge? Test yourself by answering the following true or false questions. Mulch is applied in the fall to keep the plant and the underlying ground warm.Plants that die during the winter are killed by... Continue Reading →

Fall Watering Improves Tree Health

It's been hot! And windy. In unwatered portions of the landscape you are probably seeing lawns turning brown, soil pulled away from driveway and sidewalk edges, and possibly even scorch symptoms in trees. These are all good indications that our landscapes are dry. According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, droughtmonitor.unl.edu. Lancaster county is edging toward... Continue Reading →

Summer Berries – Serviceberry

Whether for fruit production, habitat or beauty, serviceberry is an excellent addition to any landscape.  You might know these plants by other names such as Juneberry, named for the month when fruits ripen, sarviceberry, and shadbush referring to the plants bloom time "when the shad (river herring) run". There are about twenty plant species within... Continue Reading →

The Oak Twig Girdler

The appearance of dead foliage clusters scattered throughout the canopy of oak trees is very noticeable right now. Some of these twig-and-foliage shoots, called “flags”, are breaking away, littering the ground below. This is symptomatic of the oak twig girdler, Oncideres cingulata. Oaks are the most common trees to be afflicted with the oak twig... Continue Reading →

Fall Landscape Playbook

It’s difficult to imagine, as we sweat our way through early August, but in just 8 weeks we’ll be talking about early frosts. Fall is a great time to get many landscape tasks accomplished, so here’s a quick rundown of some common landscape projects listed in order of attack.   Lawn Seeding August 15th to September 15th is... Continue Reading →

Espalier: Create Living Art with Form and Function

An old horticulture practice of controlling plant growth in a flat plane against a solid surface or trellis has merit in today’s smaller landscapes. This is the art of espalier, pronounced ess-PAL-yer, or ess-PAL-yay. The word espalier is French, but is derived from the Italian word spalliera meaning “something to rest the shoulder against.” The... Continue Reading →

Cultivate Something Good – Your Garden and Your Well-being

Your yoga classes, meetings, and concerts are canceled.  Theaters are closed. The kids are out of school and you’re being encouraged to stay home. In this time of Covid-19, here are a few suggestions to cultivate something good from the National Garden Bureau. Written by C.L. Fornari, GardenComm member. Start some seeds. Nothing is more life-affirming than checking each morning to see... Continue Reading →

Fun Facts about Trees

Justin Evertson Trees are almost universally appreciated by people across the globe. Although we don’t always treat them well, there just seems to be something about them that we find interesting and comforting. That’s at least partly because of the incredible range of shapes, forms and colors they come in and also because of the... Continue Reading →

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