Time to Scout for Bagworms

If your landscape has a history of bagworm problems, it’s time to start looking for the next generation of young insects. They will soon be hatching.  The insects and their cocoons can be hard for gardeners to spot since they look so much like a natural part of the plant. Many people don’t realize the pointed oval... Continue Reading →

Dothistroma needle blight

Dothistroma needle blight is one of the most common fungal diseases of pines in Nebraska, resulting in sparse trees with thin canopies. Older, inner needles are affected first causing premature needle drop. Many species of pine are affected by this disease, but in Nebraska it's found most commonly and causes the greatest amount of damage on Austrian and Ponderosa... Continue Reading →

Crabapples for Nebraska Landscapes

Now that trees have dropped their leaves, and fall leaf coloration is done, one of my favorite sights for late fall and winter is a crabapple tree loaded with fruit. Maybe it’s just that the leaves are gone and the fruits are easier to see, but it seems to me that some crabapples develop deeper, more... Continue Reading →

Safe Winter Pesticide Storage

As the growing season draws to an end and we put away our gardening equipment, it’s also important to store any remaining pesticide products properly to prevent contamination and maintain product effectiveness for next year. But even more important, being careless with pesticide storage is an open invitation to disaster, in the form of a... Continue Reading →

Handling Pesticides Safely

Pest control depends to a great extent on how well you achieve thorough coverage of all plant parts - flowers, leaves, the undersides of leaves, and fruit.  New label directions now give flexibility in the amount of water used to dilute pesticides.  Using the highest amount of water you can often gives the best coverage.  Spray plants until... Continue Reading →

Fall Watering Improves Landscape Health

It's been hot! And windy. In unwatered portions of the landscape you may be seeing cracked soil - a good indication conditions are dry. In fall, warm dry days with cool nights usually lead to great fall leaf coloration, but dry fall conditions have a downside, too.  Fall is a time for plants to replace the moisture reserves lost... Continue Reading →

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