Bald Cypress

With winter coming sooner than we want, our trees are starting to go into their dormant state. One tree that tends to confuse people with the manner in which it goes dormant is Bald Cypress. Bald Cypress, Taxodium distichum, is a deciduous conifer that has needles that look like most other conifer trees, but looses... Continue Reading →

Rose Winter Protection

Winter is a difficult season for roses. Rapid temperature changes, sometimes as much as 20-30° F degrees in 24 hours, is very hard on plants. Unseasonably warm temperatures in January and February, along with repeated freezing and thawing of the soil can do a lot of damage. What can you do this fall to help your roses... Continue Reading →

Daffodils for Early Spring Color

Planting flowering bulbs is a fall tradition for many gardeners, and there is still plenty of time to get your bulbs in the ground this fall.  In eastern Nebraska, bulbs can be planted from late September through the end of October, ideally when soil temperatures are below 60°F degrees. This allows the root system to develop before the ground... Continue Reading →

Fall Watering Improves Landscape Health

It's been hot! And windy. In unwatered portions of the landscape you may be seeing cracked soil - a good indication conditions are dry. In fall, warm dry days with cool nights usually lead to great fall leaf coloration, but dry fall conditions have a downside, too.  Fall is a time for plants to replace the moisture reserves lost... Continue Reading →

Fall Lawn Fertilization

Fall Lawn Fertilization Fertilization is a critical step in maintaining a healthy, vigorous turf. Applying nitrogen (N) fertilizer in fall promotes turf recovery, but the type of fertilizer used – quick release vs. slow release - should change based on when your applications are made. Early Fall Fertilization From late August to late September, evapotranspiration, or water loss through the grass leaf surface, is still high.... Continue Reading →

Oak Twig Girdler Causes Dead Twigs in Trees

Every summer an unusual type of insect makes an appearance in many landscapes.  Actually, there is a small group of insects, called twig girdlers or twig pruners, that cause similar damage in a variety of trees. But fortunately, these insects are not a serious problem and their activity doesn't have serious consequences for the trees. But... Continue Reading →

Rose of Sharon for Fall Color

Let’s face it – most of our flowering shrubs are showy in spring. In order to avoid the lack of color, interest and appeal, incorporation of summer/fall flowering shrubs such as rose of Sharon will infuse color as well as an interesting arching architectural structure to the landscape.

Chinkapin Oak

The summer months are great, but they can be hot. Being outdoors in the summer months is preferred, but when it gets too hot, it can be difficult to sit outside. Shade trees can really relieve the heat of outdoors. Temperatures underneath the shade of trees can be 10-15 degrees cooler or more, according to... Continue Reading →

Summer Gathering for a Winter’s Day

Bob Henrickson, Nebraska Statewide Arboretum, plantnebraska.org Many gardeners plant “everlastings,” flowers and herbs that maintain their color and form when dried, specifically with the idea of using them in craft projects. Included in wreaths or other displays, they extend the beauty of summer’s bloom. There are many plants that hold their shape and color well,... Continue Reading →

Harvesting & Drying Herbs

Do you have beautiful herbs in your garden and want to preserve them for use this winter?  August and September are the time to get started drying your herbs. Harvest herb stems for drying from stems that are in the bud stage, but have not yet flowered. This is the stage at which leaves contain the highest amount... Continue Reading →

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