2020- The Year of Sweet Corn

The final plant of the year, promoted by the National Garden Bureau, is sweet corn. Whether picked fresh from the garden or purchased from the farmers market or local produce aisle, sweet corn continues to be among America’s favorite vegetable. Why is it so Popular? Versatility! Eaten straight off the cob or included in side dishes,... Continue Reading →

Growing Onions – Sets, Plants or Seeds?

Planting onions from small bulbs or "sets" is not the best way to grow large onions for storage.  Plants grown from sets often begin blooming in mid-summer and stubbornly refuse to stop. Once that happens, onion bulbs don't increase much in size.   Onion Sets This happens because onions are biennials. They grow foliage and a bulb the first... Continue Reading →

Growing Garlic

If you’ve grown garlic before, you know that the cloves for planting are found readily in the spring. What many do not know is that fall planted garlic produces larger cloves than spring-planted ones. Using this opportunity to plant now means it’s not too late to reap the benefits of fall-planted garlic. In selecting a... Continue Reading →

Gardeners Are Optimists

For better or worse, another gardening season is over. This week, we could talk about reviewing your gardening year, selecting disease resistant cultivars, proper pruning, watering or mulching techniques, or keeping garden records of success or failures so next year’s growing season goes better. But sometimes, you just need a little commiseration to lighten your... Continue Reading →

Pruning Raspberries

Raspberry crowns live for many years, but their canes are biennial meaning they live for two years. Each year new shoots grow from buds in the crown. Late in that first summer, these new canes develop lateral branches with fruit buds on them. Early the next spring, fruit-bearing shoots grow from these buds. After fruiting,... Continue Reading →

Mosaic Virus on Squash

Viruses represent some of the toughest diseases to manage in cucumber, squash, pumpkin, and melon plants. Often the disease doesn’t kill but does reduce the size and number of leaves, which in turn decreases fruit production. Cucumber mosaic, cucumber green mottle mosaic, watermelon mosaic, zucchini yellow mosaic, and squash mosaic are some of the viruses... Continue Reading →

Harvesting & Drying Herbs

Do you have beautiful herbs in your garden and want to preserve them for use this winter?  August and September are the time to get started drying your herbs. Harvest herb stems for drying from stems that are in the bud stage, but have not yet flowered. This is the stage at which leaves contain the highest amount... Continue Reading →

Gooseberries

Gooseberries are one of those unusual fruits not grown by many home gardeners. But they certainly are worth consideration for home fruit production, especially if you’re creating an edible landscape and need plants with good ornamental appearance as well as food production. Gooseberry plants can be used as a foundation shrub or hedge, having nice... Continue Reading →

Saving and Storing Garden Seeds

Have you ever thought about saving seeds from your own vegetable garden to grow next year?  It can certainly be done and isn’t as hard as you might think. However, before you get started there are a few important things to keep in mind when selecting plants from which to save seeds. Avoid Hybrid Plants Many, if... Continue Reading →

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