Common Grub Control Questions

What are grubs? Almost every gardener has seen grub larvae in the soil while installing new plants or tilling the vegetable garden.  The term "white grub" actually encompasses the larval stage of several scarab beetles, the most common, and most damaging, being the June beetle or masked chafer and the Japanese beetle.  Less well-known are... Continue Reading →

Yellow Nutsedge

In the last week or two, have you started to see light yellowish-green grass-like plants in your lawn or landscape beds? Guess what? You may have yellow nutsedge and it's started growing for another year. IdentificationYellow nutsedge is a member of the sedge family although it closely resembles a grass. In fact it is frequently called... Continue Reading →

Harvesting Greens

What’s the best way to harvest your greens, such as lettuce, spinach, and Swiss chard?  Before starting, remember these harvest tips. ·       Small leaves are tasty and tender. Over mature greens often become bitter.   ·       Harvest mid-morning after the dew has dried but before the hot sun comes out. Harvesting leaves dry lengthens their... Continue Reading →

Espalier: Create Living Art with Form and Function

An old horticulture practice of controlling plant growth in a flat plane against a solid surface or trellis has merit in today’s smaller landscapes. This is the art of espalier, pronounced ess-PAL-yer, or ess-PAL-yay. The word espalier is French, but is derived from the Italian word spalliera meaning “something to rest the shoulder against.” The... Continue Reading →

Handling Pesticides Safely

Pest control depends to a great extent on how well you achieve thorough coverage of all plant parts - flowers, leaves, the undersides of leaves, and fruit.  New label directions now give flexibility in the amount of water used to dilute pesticides.  Using the highest amount of water you can often gives the best coverage.  Spray plants until... Continue Reading →

Make Your Landscape Bee-friendly

Honey bees and other bee species, such as bumblebees, orchard mason bees, and leafcutter bees are very important pollinators of flower and crops.  In the home garden and orchard, gardeners are aware how important bees are for fruit and vegetable production.  But in recent years many gardeners have noticed declining bee numbers in their gardens... Continue Reading →

Lilac Selection & Pruning

Lilacs are one of the most recognized and best loved shrubs found in Nebraska landscapes. It’s also one example of a plant that performs wonderfully in northern gardens, hardiness zones 3-7 for most species, but lacks vigor and does not flower reliably in southern gardens (Zone 8 and higher). Lilacs are easy to grow and... Continue Reading →

Controlling Cucumber Beetles and Squash Bugs With Fewer Insecticides? Yes, it’s Possible!

Cucumber beetles and squash bugs are two serious insect problems of the cucurbits – cucumber, summer squash, winter squash, pumpkin, watermelon and zucchini.  They are both difficult to control, but new research gives an option to reduce their numbers using low-chemical control. The Culprits Cucumber beetles and squash bug adults both cause damage through their feeding.... Continue Reading →

COVID-19 and Farmers Markets – The Show Will Go On!

New guidance for farmers market operators was released by the Nebraska Department of Agriculture April 15, 2020. Nebraska farmers markets will be allowed to take place this year if they follow the mandatory guidance requirements, many of which are similar to procedures we are currently seeing in grocery stores. Here are a few excerpts from Guidance... Continue Reading →

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